Woodlands Battle - AWI Campaign

Below is an AAR (written by Will D.) of one of the games played in our 1777 AWI Sharpe’s Practice campaign. This battle day (3 games) ended the current mission, our second, with the British side holding off the American side as it tried to intimidate the local population. The American side was only able gain 40% completion. Based on the results of the previous two missions (both British success) I’ll be moving the campaign map down towards Albany, New York for our third mission.

August 28th, 1777
Major Blaine orders scouting patrols out to both the east and west in order to locate the rebels. He makes it clear to those on patrol that in no way can the rebels get past this picket line unnoticed.

The major paces the camp in the late in the morning hours on edge, as he yet has to find the rebels. As the morning fog clears into the afternoon a runner arrives at the camp finally with news on the rebels. It seems that the rebels are indeed moving north, the scout reports their location and indicates they were not spotted. While the major pondered an option to march parallel to the rebels in order to get ahead of them, he is clearly tired of being subtle and decides to bring them to battle soon as possible.

Though the column was ready to move out, it was going to be late in the evening when they would intercept the rebel force as the wooded terrain will impede there progress. So it is not until 7pm that the leading scout patrols contact the rebel picket line and firing rings out as they engage each other. The leading company holds up and the major sends the other companies to the left and right straight into battle.

Dearest Lady Chatterly,

Despite losing some of Sgt. McUreigh’s rangers for picket duty [-6 figs], this afternoon, we met the enemy once again and fared positively.  Moving through the woods to the far right of the centre company, we were led northwards by Lisette, the half-Indian who has been a proven pathfinder, to a clearing interspersed with thick stands of trees.

Lieutenant Moon and Chief Ochataquin’s Hurons [2 groups plus bruiser] soon delved under the canopies to the right while Ensign Townshend took his men [2 skirmisher groups] into the trees in front.  A line of rebel militia, supported by a cannon and some riflemen appeared in short order opposite us.  I recognized their mounted leader as the one we faced a previous day [Captain Hartwell].


Our skirmishers downed some of their gun crew [officer wounded, 10 Force Morale], who retaliated with a shot that sheared branches and sent splinters across them.  The Hurons crept through the undergrowth, and Moon suffered a sprain crossing a log [Bally, My Leg result].



Upon hearing the cannon, I ordered my men [2 regular and 1 Provincial group] to lie low on the ground and then to crawl in between the two stands of trees, and thus progress was slow [waited to also use the secondary deployment point, but no Leader 1 card came up until turn 5!] until our muskets were within 80 rods of the cannon.  With the lieutenant trailing behind, the Huron chief led his warriors to the edge of the woods and gave the Continentals a fusillade that was soon returned very quickly by them at three rounds a minute!


Townshend’s men retreated into the woods to reload and emerged back out to re-engage the cannon and rifles.  A few more of their men and ours dropped before the cannon turned to face my line, spouting fire.   The ball whistled over us [about 4 shock], we rose from crawling, and unleashed our first fire [20 shots] upon the rebels.   This discouraged their line enough that their Captain began to signal a withdrawal.

The remaining two gunners understood and spirited their 3 pounder to safety, but the eight regulars in front of the Hurons must have misheard and started to cautiously approach the woods [At ‘em, boys! rolled a 3” movement].   Chief Ochataquin must have seen the opportunity and launched all of his braves from the woods in a forward rush of flung tomahawks!



Townshend’s men retreated into the woods to reload and emerged back out to re-engage the cannon and rifles.  A few more of their men and ours dropped before the cannon turned to face my line, spouting fire.   The ball whistled over us [about 4 shock], we rose from crawling, and unleashed our first fire [20 shots] upon the rebels.   This discouraged their line enough that their Captain began to signal a withdrawal.

The remaining two gunners understood and spirited their 3 pounder to safety, but the eight regulars in front of the Hurons must have misheard and started to cautiously approach the woods [At ‘em, boys! rolled a 3” movement].   Chief Ochataquin must have seen the opportunity and launched all of his braves from the woods in a forward rush of flung tomahawks!

The savagery of the assault threw the browncoats in disarray [after fisticuffs, Force Morale down from 10 to 6 to the British FM of 10], but exposed Ochataquin to a violent volley from the line of blue behind them, sending a couple braves reeling to the ground.   I could not halt in time the vengeful butchery that happened afterwards to the rebels left upon the field, as the rest of them retired into the growing darkness with the worst of memories [Captain Hartwell now hated enemy].

An Indian medicine man accompanied me in place of Doctor Nixon who was up to his arms in surgery at the Johannson house.  The elder quickly began tending to both Indian and English wounded with his strange poultices and herbals, particularly the revered Lieutenant Moon.   The other Indians did mourn their losses again …and collected more ghastly trophies in return for scattering the enemy off.  I have grown to respect their Chief, as his battle prowess and leadership with Lieutenant Moon has led to our growing victories in this wilderness despite their band’s ever dwindling numbers [bruiser pocket friend].   I discern that there is a dangerous fever for revenge in him.

During our Company officer council, he spoke forcefully of keeping a “white man’s war” away from native villages.  His words reinforced my initial desire that our army move southward as planned to New York rather than up the Mohawk River valley. We are getting closer to succeeding in our endeavor to cut off New England from the rest of the colonies.  In due time, God willing, this rebellion will capitulate.

Ever Yours,

Captain Reginald Daltrey,
24th Regiment of Foot

August 29th
Maj. Blaine is once again pleased with the performance of his troops as they drive off the rebels; though not many dead there were a lot of wounded in this exchange. Again with the darkness there is no opportunity to immediately pursue the rebels.

The morning breaks with heavy fog that pretty much insures there will be no pursuit. Instead Maj. Blaine orders the column to march to Bennington so they can drop off there wounded and get back onto the road. Familiar with the area they easily find Bennington in the thick fog by late morning.

Once the fog lifts in the afternoon, Maj. Blaine get the column in pursuit of the Rebels whom has vague reports are moving south at a fast rate. He sends off a Patrol to check on the Sutter farmstead to the southeast to see if it was burned down.

By evening there is no sign of the rebels and he suspects they are fleeing to south. Once the patrol returns information them that the farmstead was intact, he decides the Rebel incursion is over. He’ll march of Pittsfield and see what damage was done in the morning however.



Comments

  1. Awesome work! In addition to your figures and scenery, I love your campaign map. How did you folks design it?

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